Biography: 

Aaron Rafi is a Canadian poet, now living in Toronto, best known for his Surviving the Censor: The Unspoken Words of Osip Mandelstam (2006). Its 48 prose poems are spoken by the Russian poet Osip, his wife Nadezhda, a voice from Stalin's transit camps, and a researcher.

Biography: 

Born November 15, 1881, Franklin P. Adams worked for forty years as a leading New York newspaper daily columnist and wit penning light verse and a weekly diary that amused a large and literate audience. A few years after graduating from the Armour Scientific Academy in Chicago in 1899, Adams first entered journalism in Chicago.

Biography: 
  • Hargreaves, Mary W. M. "Adams, John Quincy." American National Biography Online. American Council of Learned Societies: Oxford University Press, 2000.
Biography: 
  • Adams, Mary Electa. From Distant Shores: Poems. [Toronto: 1898]. Unpaginated. Internet Archive
  • Reid, John G. "Adams, Mary Electa." Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online. Volume XII. Toronto: University of Toronto and Laval University, 2000.
Biography: 

Sarah Flower was born in Harlow, Essex, and married William Bridges Adams in 1834. Harold William Stephenson wrote a biography of this actress--Lady Macbeth, 1837--dramatic poet (Vivia Perpetua, 1841) and Unitarian hymn writer in The Author of Nearer my God to Thee in 1922.

Biography: 
  • Rogers, Pat. “Addison, Joseph (1672-1719).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
Pseudonym(s): 
Dr. Mildred Undertwang,
Biography: 
Biography: 

Florence Anthony, the poet, is known mainly by her pseudonym Ai. For more poems by her, see the Academy of America Poets

 

Biography: 
  • Butscher, Edward. "Aiken, Conrad." American Biographical Dictionary Online. American Council of Learned Societies: Oxford University Press, 2000.
Biography: 
  • Dix, Robin. “Akenside, Mark (1721-1770).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
Biography: 

Cecil Frances Humphreys was born at 25 Eccles Street, Dublin, and lived in Miltown House, county Tyrone, Ireland, beginning in 1833. She married the Right Reverend W. Alexander, Bishop of Derry and Raphoe, in 1850. She wrote nearly 400 hymns, among which her work for children established her reputation as a poet.

Biography: 
  • Alline, Henry. Hymns and Spiritual Songs. Boston: Peter Edes, 1786. Early American Imprints, Series 1, no. 44842. Online.
  • Bumsted, J.M. "Alline, Henry." Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online. Vol. IV. University of Toronto / Université Laval, 2000.
Biography: 

William Allingham, born at Ballyshannon, published and edited verse from 1850 to his death in London on November 18, 1889. He worked for the customs service in London until his retirement in 1870, when he became sub-editor of Fraser's Magazine, then editor from 1874 to 1879. He married Helen Paterson, the water colourist. He was buried in St.

Biography: 

Elleke Boehmer (editor of Empire Writing: An Anthology of Colonial Literature 1870-1918 [Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998]: 470) gives what is known about Mary Frances Leslie Miller's marriage (to Ernest Ames, a railway engineer) and book, An ABC, for Baby Patriots (1899).

Biography: 
  • Anderson, James. Sawney's Letters and Cariboo Rhymes. Toronto: W. S. Johnson, 1895. Internet Archive
Biography: 
  • Anderson, Robert T. Canadian Born and Other Western Verse. Edmonton: Esdale Press, 1913. Internet Archive
  • --. The Old Timer and Other Poems. Edmonton: Edmonton Printing and Publishing, 1909. Internet Archive
  • --. Troopers in France. Coles Printing Co., 1932
    Biography: 

    Guillaume Apollinaire (1880-1918) was the illegitimate son of a Polish mother whose name was Kostrowitzky. After desultory studies in Paris, he led a rather nomadic life until the First Great War in which he enlisted in 1914. He was wounded in 1916 and died in the influenza epidemic of 1918. Apollinaire has many moods and many styles.

    Biography: 
    • Collini, Stefan. “Arnold, Matthew (1822-1888).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    James Arthur's first book of poetry, Charms Against Lightning, was published as a Lannan Literary Selection by Copper Canyon Press in 2012. His work has appeared in Poetry, Ploughshares, The New Republic and The New Yorker. In 2003 he received an MFA from the University of Washington, and he is currently an Assistant Proffessor at Johns Hopkins University.

    Biography: 

    Thomas Kyme, Anne's husband, expelled her from their Lincolnshire home, after Anne herself left him to preach in London, denying the doctrine of transubstantiation, which holds that the bread and wine of the Christian mass or communion are literally transformed into the body and blood of Jesus Christ.

    Biography: 

    Born in Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, on July 25, 1825, John Askham had almost no formal education. After labouring as a child in his father's shoe-making shop, Askham earned his living as a shoe-maker. He taught himself to read and write and published his verses in local newspapers and then as volumes, financed by subscriptions.

    Pseudonym(s): 
    Gaultier, Bon
    Biography: 

    With Sir Theodore Martin, Aytoun was responsible for Bon Gaultier's Ballads (1845).

    Biography: 

    Mary Balfour published at least four books:

    Biography: 

    Born in Kibworth, Leicestershire, Anna Letitia Aitkin was educated at home by her mother, Jane Jennings. Her father became tutor in divinity at a new Presbyterian school at Warrington, Lancashire, where 15-year-old Anna became friends with Joseph Priestley and his wife when he moved there as tutor in languages in 1761.

    Biography: 
    • Coleborne, Bryan. "Barber, Mary (c.1685-1755)." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Pseudonym(s): 
    Ingoldsby, Thomas
    Biography: 
    • Scott, Rosemary. "Barham, Richard Harris (1788-1845)." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    An often-published antiquarian, novelist, and travel writer, Baring-Gould was born in Exeter and educated at Clare College, Cambridge. In 1864 he became curate of Horbury, Yorkshire, but moved to become rector of Lew Trenchard, Devon, in 1881, when he inherited his family estate there, and stayed until his death.

    Biography: 
    • Wrigley, Chris. "Barnes, William (1801-1886)." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Massai, Sonia. "Barnfield, Richard (bap. 1574, d. 1620)." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    Biography: 

    Born at Indian Hill, Ohio, March 6, 1809, David Bates was educated as a clerk in Buffalo and then in a mercantile house in Indianapolis, Indiana. Eventually he rose in the company to be a full member and its buyer, and he and his family settled in Philadelphia. He contributed as a man of letters to journals and published a volume of poetry, Eolian, in 1849.

    Biography: 

    Katharine Lee Bates, born August 12, 1859, graduated from Wellesley College in 1880, joined its English Department five years later, and earned a Masters degree there in 1891 following study at Oxford in 1888-89. She published the scholarly work for which she is best known critically, The English Religious Drama, in 1893, and edited many classics of English literature.

    Biography: 
    • Brown, David. “Bateson, Thomas (d. 1630).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) spent most of his life in Paris, though one can see in some of his poetry the influence of an early voyage he made to the East Indies. His mother and stepfather had encouraged this trip in the hope that it would make Baudelaire forget about following a literary career.

    Biography: 

    After taking his M.A. and Ph.D. at Harvard University, Joseph Warren Beach returned to Minneapolis in 1907 to the Department of English at the University of Minnesota, his undergraduate alma mater. Starting as Assistant Professor, he became Associate Professor in 1917 and Professor in 1924. Beach chaired the English Department from 1939 to 1948, after which time he retired.

    Biography: 
    • Robinson, Roger J.. “Beattie, James (1735-1803).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Finkelpearl, P. J.. “Beaumont, Francis (1584/5-1616).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Halsey, Alan. “Beddoes, Thomas Lovell (1803-1849).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    Born in 673 and sent at seven years old by his parents to the monastery of St. Peter in Monkwearmouth, Bede moved to the abbey at Jarrow in 682, where he lived as a monk until his death on May 25, 735.

    Biography: 
    • Todd, Janet. “Behn, Aphra (1640?-1689).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Tolley, A. T.. “Bell, Julian Heward (1908–1937).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    • Bell, Julian. Winter Movement and Other Poems. London: Chatto and Windus, 1930. PR6003 .E434 W5 1930 E. J. Pratt Library at Victoria University
    Biography: 

    Rémy Belleau (1528-1577) was also a member of the "Pléiade" and an enthusiastic student of the classics. He imitated Anacreon in his Petites Inventions (1556), but is best known for his Bergerie (1565), a pastoral narrative interspersed with poems. Belleau excels in descriptive poetry and especially in the portrayal of nature of which "Avril" is the best-known example.

    Biography: 

    Bergonzi, Bernard. "Belloc, (Joseph) Hilaire Pierre René (1870–1953)." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.

    Biography: 

    Born April 24, 1862, to Mary Sidgwick and Edward White Benson, future archbishop of Canterbury (1882-1896), Arthur Christopher Benson became a popular essayist of Edwardian England, the librettist of England's beloved anthem, "Land of Hope and Glory," and the editor of Queen Victoria's letters.

    Biography: 
    • Benson, Mary Josephine. My Pocket Beryl. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1921. Internet Archive.
    • "Benson, Mary Josephine Trotter." Canada's Early Women Writers. Simon Fraser University.
    Pseudonym(s): 
    Epsilon,
    Farren, Richard J.
    Farren, Richard M.
    Biography: 

    John Betjeman, son of Ernest Edward Betjemann (a furniture manufacturer) and Mabel Bessie Dawson, was born at Parliament Hill Mansions, north London. John adopted his style of spelling the family name around the age of twenty-one (the name can be traced back to Dutch or German origin). After attending Byron House Montessori School, where he was briefly taught by T. S.

    Biography: 
    • Contemporary Authors Online, Gale, 2002.
    • Bevington, Helen. Dr. Johnson's Waterfall, and Other Poems. Boston: Houghton, 1946.
    • --. Nineteen Million Elephants, and Other Poems. Boston: Houghton, 1950.
    • --.A Change of Sky, and Other Poems. Boston: Houghton, 1956.
    Biography: 

    Cartoonist, political satirist, poet, and writer of fiction, Ambrose Bierce was born in Horse Cave Creek, Ohio. He enlisted very young in the 9th Indiana Infantry in the American civil war and had risen to the rank of lieutenant by its close.

    Biography: 
    • Hatcher, John. “Binyon, (Robert) Laurence (1869–1943).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004. 14 Aug. 2009 .
    • Binyon, Laurence. Lyric Poems. London: Elkin Mathews, 1894. end .B568 A155 1894 Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library.
    Biography: 
    • David, and Other Poems. Toronto: Ryerson Press, 1942. Governor General's Award.
    • Now is Time. Toronto: Ryerson, 1945. Governor General's Award
    • The Strait of Anian: Selected Poems. Toronto: Ryerson Press, 1948.
    • Trial of a city and other verse. Toronto: Ryerson, 1952.
    Biography: 

    For more poems, see the Academy of America Poets

     

    Biography: 
    • Willoughby, L. A. "Jethro Bithell: A Biographical Note." German Life and Letters 11.4 (July 1958): 253-56.
    Biography: 
    • Carruthers, Gerard. “Blair, Robert (1699-1746).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Essick, Robert N.. “Blake, William (1757-1827).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    James A. Bland, perhaps the greatest African-American folksong writer, was born in 1854 in Flushing, New York. His father, who received a law degree from Howard University, was the first African American appointed examiner to the United States Patent Office.

    Pseudonym(s): 
    Kathleen Kent
    Biography: 
    • Blewett, Jean. The Cornflower and Other Poems. Toronto: William Briggs, 1906. Internet Archive.
    • --. Jean Blewett's Poems. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1922. Internet Archive.
    • --. Heart Songs. Toronto: George N. Morang, 1897. Internet Archive.
    Biography: 

    Edward Dickinson Blodgett, Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Alberta, and a member of the Royal Society of Canada, has authored seventeen books of poetry. His Apostrophes: Woman at a Piano (1996) won the Governor- General's Award for English language poetry.

     

    Biography: 
    • Longford, Elizabeth. “Blunt, Wilfrid Scawen (1840-1922).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Barcroft Capel Boake notes and Barcroft Henry Thomas Boake letters (State Library of New South Wales); Boake manuscript (National Library of Australia).
    • Boake, Barcroft Henry Thomas. Where the Dead Men Lie and Other Poems. Ed. A.G. Stephens. Sydney: Angus and Robertson, 1897.
    Biography: 

    Louise Bogan was born in Livermore, Maine, August 11, 1897, and was educated at the Girls' Latin High School and Boston University, which she left without taking a degree. Her first marriage, to Curt Alexander, an army officer, in 1916, was effectively over by 1918. Their daughter Maidie was born Oct. 19, 1917, but was raised by Bogan's parents. Alexander died in 1920.

    Pseudonym(s): 
    Jackson, Bessie
    Biography: 

    Lucille Bogan, (nee Armstrong) was born in Amory, Mississippi, on April 1, 1897 and grew up in Birmingham, Alabama. She married Nazareth Bogan, with whom she had two children. Bogan, who also used the pseudonym Bessie Jackson, was a blues writer and performer, known for her explicit lyrics, which covered topics such as sex, prostitution and alcoholism.

    Biography: 

    For more poems, see the Griffin Prize

     

    and The Academy of America Poets

     

    Biography: 
    • Boker, George Henry. The Lessons of Life, and other Poems. 1848.
    • --. The Podesta's Daughter, and Other Miscellaneous Poems. Philadelphia: A. Hart, 1852. Internet Archive
    • --. Plays and Poems. 2 vols. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1856. Internet Archive
    Biography: 
    • Boughn, Michael. 22 Skidoo / SubTractions. Toronto: Book Thug, 2009. PS8553 .O7915 A62 2009 Robarts Library
    • --. Cosmographia: A Post-lucretian Faux Micro-epic. Toronto: Book Thug, 2010. PS8553 .O7915 C67 2010 Robarts Library
    Biography: 

    A late Victorian English poet from Buddington, Sussex, Francis William Bourdillon was born on March 22, 1852, educated at Worcester College, Oxford, and acted as tutor to the Prince and the Princess Christian at Cumberland Lodge. He published 13 volumes of poems from 1878 to 1921.

    Biography: 

    Little is known of this soldier-poet of the First World War. At least three of his poems were originally published in The Stars and Stripes, an eight-page weekly brought out in France by the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) of the United States Army from February 8, 1918, to June 13, 1919.

    Biography: 
    • Marston, J. W. "Bowles, William Lisle (1762-1850)." Rev. Leon Litvack. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    One of the greatest poets of the 17th century, Anne Bradstreet was born in Northamptonshire, England, ca. 1612-13, daughter to Thomas Dudley, a clerk, and Dorothy Yorke. By 1619 Dudley became steward to the earl of Lincolnshire at Sempringham, and three years later acquired Anne's future husband, Simon Bradstreet, as an assistant, freshly graduated from Cambridge University.

    Biography: 
    • Bramer, Shannon. Be Mine. Toronto: BookThug, 2010.
    • --. Fishings. Toronto: BookThug, 2007. canlit pam 04394 Thomas Fisher Rare Book
    Biography: 

    Christopher John Brennan was born in Sydney, Australia in 1870 of Irish parents. Brennan first studied for the priesthood, but abandoned his vocation at St. Ignatius College for the University of Sydney. There Brennan concentrated on classics and philosophy, graduating from the University with first class honours in 1891.

    Pseudonym(s): 
    Melissa,
    Biography: 

    Turner, Katherine. "Brereton, Jane (1685–1740)." Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Online ed. Ed. Lawrence Goldman. Oxford: OUP.

    Pseudonym(s): 
    Pasquil
    Biography: 
    • Brennan, Michael G.. “Breton , Nicholas (1554/5-c.1626).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    Robert Bridges was born October 23, 1844, in Walmer, Kent. Educated at Eton College from 1854 to 1863, at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, from 1863 to 1867, where he took a B.A., and finally at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London, where he completed his M.B. in 1874. He served as a physician successively in London at St.

    Biography: 
    • Gillespie, Alyssa Dinega. "Joseph Brodsky (1940-1996)". Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 285: Russian Writers Since 1980. A Bruccoli Clark Layman Book. Edited by Marina Balina and Mark Lipovetsky. Gale Group, 2004. pp. 17-39.
    Pseudonym(s): 
    Bell, Acton
    Biography: 
    • Smith, Margaret. “Brontë, Anne (1820-1849).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Pseudonym(s): 
    Bell, Currer
    Biography: 
    • Alexander, Christine. “Brontë , Charlotte (1816-1855).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Pseudonym(s): 
    Bell, Ellis
    Biography: 
    • Barker, Juliet. “Brontë, Emily Jane (1818-1848).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    Gilbert E. Brooke was born March 28, 1873, at Hyères, France, and educated at Monkton Combe School near Bath (1884-88), Pensionnat Georgens, Ouchy, Switzerland (1889-90), Pembroke College, Cambridge (B.A. 1894; M.A., 1901), London Hospital (1894-96; L.R.C.P., L.R.C.S.), and Edinburgh (1897; D.P.H. 1902).

    Biography: 

    Rupert Brooke was born August 3, 1887, at Rugby, Warwickshire, and educated there and at King's College, Cambridge, which he left with a degree in 1909. His first book of verse, Poems, came out in 1911. After studying briefly in Munich in 1912, he returned to live in England at the Old Vicarage in Grantchester, Cambridgeshire.

    Biography: 
    Biography: 

    Charles William Shirley Brooks was born on 29 April, 1816 at 52 Doughty Street, London. The son of Elizabeth and William Brooks (an architect), he was articled to his uncle Charles Sabine of Oswestry after receiving his early education. In 1938, he passed the Incorporated Law Society's examination, but there is no record of Brooks becoming a solicitor.

    Biography: 
    • Seccombe, Thomas. “Brown, Thomas Edward (1830-1897).” Rev. Sayoni Basu. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Jones, William R.. “Brown, Thomas (bap. 1663, d. 1704).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • O'Callaghan, Michelle. “Browne, William (1590/91-1645?).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Stone, Marjorie. “Browning , Elizabeth Barrett (1806-1861).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Ryals, Clyde de L.. “Browning, Robert (1812-1889).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    Poet, novelist and newspaperman Charles Bruce was born in 1906 in Port Shoreham, Nova Scotia. After graduating from Mount Allison University in 1927 with a Bachelor of Arts, he joined the Canadian Press in Halifax and was transferred to Toronto in 1933. Among his six collections of poetry is The Mulgrave Road, which won the Governor-General’s Award for Poetry in 1951.

    Biography: 

    Although not a South African, but rather educated at Haslemere, Alice Mary Buckton's The Burden of Engela (1904) well described the life of a Boer woman on a Transvaal farm during the Anglo-Boer War. (Thanks to André le Roux, Reference section, National Library of South Africa, Cape Town, for assistance.)

     

    Biography: 

    Professor Arthur Henry Reginald Buller, chair of the Department of Botany, University of Manitoba (1904-36), was born in Birmingham on August 19, 1874. He obtained his Ph.D. at Leipzig before joining the university. His best-known academic work was Researches in Fungi, 7 vols.

    Biography: 

    John Bunyan was born at Elstow, near Bedford, and baptized Nov. 30, 1628, the son of a tinker, and like his father a tinker. He joined joined the parliamentary forces in the English civil war in 1644. On leaving, he married in 1646 a pious woman whose only dowry was two books, The Plain Man's Pathway to Heaven and Lewis Bayly's The Practice of Piety. They had four children.

    Biography: 

    Born in Boston on January 30, 1866, Frank Gelett Burgess graduated from M.I.T. in 1887 with a B.Sc. and went to work as a draftsman, eventually becoming an instructor at the University of California at Berkeley. His gift was comic verse and fiction.

    Pseudonym(s): 
    Bard of Prescott Street,
    Biography: 
    • Burke, Johnny. The Ballads of Johnny Burke: A Short Anthology. Newfoundland Historical Society Pamphlet 1. Ed. Paul Mercer. St. John's: Newfoundland Historical Society, 1974.
    • --. St. John's Advertiser and Fishermen's Guide: A Racy Little Song and Joke Book. 1894.
    Biography: 
    • Crawford, Robert. “Burns, Robert (1759-1796).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    Clara G. Dolliver, a San Franciscan, published poems and short stories in journals such as St. Nicholas Magazine and Oliver Optic's Magazine. She was especially well-known for the poem "No Baby in the House" (see Nancy J. Peters and Lawrence Ferlingetti, Literary San Francisco [San Francisco: Harper and Row, 1980]: 46-48).

    Biography: 
    • Quehen, Hugh de. “Butler, Samuel (bap. 1613, d. 1680).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Monson, Craig. “Byrd, William (1542/3?-1623).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • McGann, Jerome. “Byron, George Gordon Noel, sixth Baron Byron (1788-1824).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    Cædmon's story has one source -- Book IV, Chapter 24, of the Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum (finished in 731) by the Venerable Bede (673-735), a monk of Jarrow in Northumbria. The following excerpt is rendered into modern English from A History of the English Church and People, translated by Leo Shirley-Price (Penguin Books, 1955): 245-47:

    Biography: 

    Charles Stuart Calverley, born on December 22, 1831, at Martley, Worcestershire, was educated at Marlborough College, Harrow, Oxford, and Cambridge, and was elected a fellow of Christ's College and appointed a lecturer in Classics in 1857. His Verses and Translations (1862), and later translations of Theocritus and Virgil, stem from his academic research.

    Biography: 
    • Cambridge, Ada. Hymns on the Litany. Oxford: J.H. and J. Parker, 1865.
    • --. Hymns on the Holy Communion. London: Houlston and Wright, 1866.
    • --. The Manor House and Other Poems. London: Daldy, Isbister, 1875.
    • --. Unspoken Thoughts. London: Kegan Paul, 1887.
    Biography: 
    • Carnall, Geoffrey. “Campbell, Thomas (1777-1844).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    Born in Kitchener (then Berlin), Ontario, Campbell grew up in Wiarton, attended high school in Owen Sound, and studied at University College in 1881-82 (where he wrote for the student newspaper The Varsity) and Wycliffe College in 1882-83, Toronto, and then at the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

    Biography: 
    • Lindley, David. “Campion, Thomas (1567-1620).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Beales, Derek. “Canning, George (1770-1827).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Caple, Natalee. The Heart is its own Reason. London, ON: Insomniac Press, 1998. [fiction]
    • --. Mackerel Sky. Markham, ON: Thomas Allen, 2004. [fiction]
    Biography: 

    Except for the elegy on Donne, which first appeared in Donne's Poems, 1633, the poems by Carew in this selection were first published shortly after his death, in Poems, 1640. A considerable number of them were set to music, and numerous manuscript versions of this song exist with considerable differences of text.

    Biography: 
    • Mendyk, S.. “Carew, Richard (1555-1620).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    An illegitimate child, possibly of George Savile, marquess of Halifax (1633-95), Henry Carey earned a living as a writer of burlesques, poems, and occasionally music. A protégé of Addison, who liked his "Sally in our Alley," Carey succeeded best when he was most amusing.

    Biography: 

    Thomas Carlyle was born on December 4, 1795. After attending Annan Academy and Edinburgh University, he taught mathematics for a time before finding his vocation as one of the foremost essayists, biographers, and historians of his century.

    Biography: 

    Born in Fredericton, New Brunswick, in the Canadian Maritimes, and educated at the University of New Brunswick, Carman authored more than 50 volumes of poetry in his lifetime and became recognized, after his coast-to-coast tour in 1921 reading his poetry, as Canada's unofficial poet laureate. His career as a man of letters was never in doubt for this first cousin of the poet Charles G. D.

    Pseudonym(s): 
    Lewis Carroll
    Biography: 

    Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, also known as Lewis Carroll (his pseudonym), was born in 1832 and educated at Rugby College and Christ Church, Oxford. Although a lecturer in mathematics there from 1855, Dodgson achieved international fame as the author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1866) and Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found there (1871).

    Biography: 

    William Herbert Carruth, born on April 5, 1859, near Osawatomie, Kansas, received his B.A. in modern languages at the University of Kansas (1880), studied at the Universities of Berlin and Munich, and obtained his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University (1889, 1893). He served as Professor of Modern Languages and then German at the University of Kansas throughout his life.

    Biography: 
    • Carryl, Charles Edward. Davy and the Goblin or What Followed Reading "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland". Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1885.
    Biography: 

    Born on September 4, 1824, at Mount Healthy, close to Cincinnati, Ohio, Phoebe Cary and her older sister Alice co-published poems in 1849 and then Phoebe went on to bring out three volumes of her own:

    Biography: 
    • Cunningham, Valentine. “Sprigg, Christopher St John (1907–1937).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    • Caudwell, Christopher. Poems. London: John Lane, 1939. PR 6037. P64A17 1939 Robarts Library
    Biography: 
    • Burnett, Mark Thornton. “Chapman, George (1559/60-1634).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Kishlansky, Mark A., and John Morrill. “Charles I (1600-1649).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Groom, Nick. “Chatterton, Thomas (1752-1770).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Gray, Douglas. “Chaucer, Geoffrey (c.1340-1400).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    André-Marie Chenier (1762-1794) was a victim of the French Revolution. Born in Constantinople of a Greek mother and a French father in the diplomatic service, he early felt the influence of classical antiquity though he was educated in France. Chénier was widely travelled and active in politics. Arrested in France on a false suspicion of animosity to the new regime, he was imprisoned at St.

    Biography: 
    • Pailin, David A.. “Herbert, Edward, first Baron Herbert of Cherbury and first Baron Herbert of Castle Island (1582?-1648).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    Gilbert Keith Chesterton was born on 29 May, 1874 at 32 Sheffield Terrace, Campden Hill, London. He was the elder son of Edward Chesterton (an estate agent) and Marie Louise (née Grosjean). As Chesterton would later emphasize in his Autobiography (1936), he had a comfortable upbringing in a middle-class family and a generally happy childhood.

    Biography: 

    Recollections by V. M. Padmini Chettur (October 2006)

    Biography: 

    Born February 11, 1802, in Medford, Massachusetts, Lydia Maria Child made her living as a novelist, story-story writer, schoolteacher, editor, writer for children, and controversialist. Her first notorious work, a novel entitled Hobomok, A Tale of Early Times (1824), celebrated interracial marriage.

    Biography: 
    • Groves, Jeffrey D., "Chivers, Thomas Holley," American National Biography Online (American Council of Learned Societies, 2000).
    Biography: 

    Margaret Christakos teaches creative writing at the School of Continuing Studies, University of Toronto. She also works as a poetry advisor/mentor with WIER (Writers in Electronic Residence), with the MFA program at the University of Guelph-Humber, and with Diaspora Dialogues.

    Biography: 
    • Ezell, Margaret J. M.. “Chudleigh , Mary, Lady Chudleigh (bap. 1656, d. 1710).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    • The Poetry and Prose of Mary, Lady Chudleigh. Ed. Margaret J. M. Ezell. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.
    Biography: 
    • The Poetical Works of Charles Churchill Ed. Douglas Grant. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1956.
    • Sambrook, James. “Churchill, Charles (1732-1764).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • The Early Poems of John Clare, 1804–1822. Ed. E. Robinson and D. Powell. 2 vols. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989
    • John Clare: Poems of the Middle Period, 1822–1837. Ed. E. Robinson, D. Powell, and P. M. S. Dawson. 4 vols. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996–98.
    Biography: 

    George Elliott Clarke is the E.J. Pratt Professor of Canadian Literature at the University of Toronto. His works include the poem-novel, Whylah Falls (1990), the narrative lyric sequence, Execution Poems (2001), and the verse-play and opera, Beatrice Chancy (1999).

    Biography: 

    Paul Claudel (1868-1955) was a professional diplomat who represented France as ambassador in many countries including China and the United States. In his poetry, he reveals himself as a fervent Catholic and mystic. Claudel often writes in short versets which make his thought difficult to follow.

    Biography: 
    • The Poems of John Cleveland. Ed. Brian Morris and Eleanor Withington. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1967.
    • Cousins, A. D.. “Cleveland, John (bap. 1613, d. 1658).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    Wayne Clifford is a Canadian poet, editor, and educator. He has written more than a dozen books of poetry, including the goundbreaking sonnet sequence The Exile's Papers, which currently extends over three volumes. After attaining his M.A. and M.F.A. at the University of Iowa in 1969, he spent three and half decades working at a small college in Kingston, Ontario.

    Biography: 
    • Kenny, Anthony. “Clough, Arthur Hugh (1819-1861).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • George M. Cohan, Twenty Years on Broadway and the Years It Took to Get There (New York: Harper, 1925).
    Biography: 
    • Thomas Cole's Poetry. Ed. Marshall B. Tymn. York: Liberty Cap Books, 1972.
    • Wallach, Alan. "Cole, Thomas." American National Biography Online. American Council of Learned Societies: Oxford University Press, 2000.
    Biography: 

    Born September 19, 1796, at Kingsdown, Bristol, Hartley Coleridge was the oldest son of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. He was the subject of one of his father's finest poems, "Frost at Midnight," and of Wordsworth's astute "To H. C. -- Six Years Old." After his parents separated, Hartley was brought up by Robert Southey at Keswick.

    Pseudonym(s): 
    Anodos
    Biography: 
    • McGowran, Katharine. “Coleridge, Mary Elizabeth (1861-1907).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Beer, John. “Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Griffin, Dustin. “Collins, William (1721-1759).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Colombo, John Robert. Abracadabra. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1967.
    • --. The Sad Truths: New Poems. Toronto: Peter Martin Associates, 1974.
    • --. Selected Translations. Windsor, ON: Black Moss Press, 1982.
    • --. Selected Poems. Windsor, ON: Black Moss Press, 1982.
    Biography: 

    Edmund Vance Cooke, popularly known as "the poet laureate of childhood," was born on June 5, 1866, in Port Dover, Ontario, Canada. He began working at 13-14 years old for the White Sewing Machine Co. factory and stayed there for 14 years until he became a self-employed poet and lecturer in 1893. His first book of poems, A Patch of Pansies, came out the next year.

    Biography: 

    Little is known of Dr. D. Cooper other than that six songs of his survive in manuscripts and a fragment of an early printed book of the period. For this text, see R. L. Greene, The Early English Carols (1935), no. 465; and John Stevens, Music & Poetry in the Early Tudor Court (London: Methuen, 1961): 408-09 (and Appendix B, nos.

    Biography: 
    • Cranfield, Nicholas W. S.. “Corbett, Richard (1582-1635).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • De-la-Noy, Michael. “Cornford, (Rupert) John (1915–1936).” Rev. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    • Cornford, John. Collected Writings. Ed. by Jonathan Galassi. Manchester: Carcanet Press, 1986. HX246 .C78 A2 1986 Robarts Library
    Pseudonym(s): 
    Hope, Laurence
    Biography: 

    Adela Florence Cory was born on April 9, 1865, at Stoke Bishop, Gloucestershire, to Colonel Arthur Cory and Fanny Elizabeth Griffin. She was brought up by relations in England and attended school in Richmond near London while her father, in the Bombay army, was posted in Lahore, India.

    Biography: 

    Educator (his tenure as Assistant Master of Eton College lasted from 1845 to 1872) and author of A Guide to Modern British History (New York: Holt, 1880-82), William Johnson became William Johnson Cory after his retirement. A brief biography appears in the third edition of Ionica, his translation of classical poems, as edited by Arthur C. Benson (London: G.

    Biography: 

    Dani Couture is a Toronto-based writer and editor. She is the author of two collections of poetry: Good Meat (Pedlar Press, 2006), and Sweet (Pedlar Press, 2010), which won the Relit Award for Poetry and was a finalist for the Trillium Book Award for Poetry. Her first novel, Algoma, was published by Invisible Publishing in 2011.

    Biography: 
    • Lindsay, Alexander. “Cowley, Abraham (1618-1667).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Baird, John D.. “Cowper, William (1731-1800).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 
    • Faulkner, Thomas C.. “Crabbe, George (1754-1832).” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford: OUP, 2004.
    Biography: 

    In a preface dated April 20, 1901, Craig introduces his one book of verse by explaining that it "possesses neither literary nor poetic merit" and that it "is published at the request of sundry friends of the author employed on the Beira and Mashonaland Railways" (7).

    No other biographical information is available.

    Biography: 

    Born the daughter of a nonconformist minister in Stoke-on-Trent in Staffordshire, Dinah Mulock took her mother and siblings to London and supported them by writing novels, the most successful of which, John Halifax, Gentleman (1856), enabled her eventually to build Corner House in Shortlands, Kent, where she spent the rest of her life.

    Biography: 
    • Harding, Walter. "Cranch, Christopher Pearse." American National Biography Online. American Council of Learned Societies, 2000.
    Biography: 

    Born on November 1, 1871, in Newark, New Jersey, Stephen Crane grew up in Port Jervis and Asbury Park.

    Biography: 

    Adelaide Crapsey taught at Kemper Hall (1902-04), Miss Lowe's Preparatory School, Stamford, Conn. (1906-08), and Smith College (1911-12). She invented the quintain and died much too young for one with such astonishing skill as a poet.

    Biography: 

    Isabella Valancy Crawford was born in Dublin in 1850 (according to conjecture, on Dec. 25), the sixth child of Dr. Stephen Dennis Crawford and Sidney Scott Crawford. The family emigrated to Canada and settled in Paisley, Ontario, in 1857, where her father became the settlement's family doctor.

    Biography: 

    Lynn Crosbie has a Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Toronto and is a Toronto-based writer.

    Biography: 
    • Abbot, Leonard D. Ernest Howard Crosby: A Valuation and a Tribute. Westwood, Ma., 1907.
    • Crosby, Ernest Howard. Broad-cast. New York: Funk and Wagnalls, 1905.
    • --. Plain Talk in Psalm and Parable. Boston: Small, Maynard & Company, 1899. 3rd edn.: London: F.R. Henderson, 1901.
    Biography: 

    Thomas William Hodgson Crosland was born in Leeds on July 21, 1865. He was among the most acerbic men of letters and journalists of his lifetime. An anti-Scottish Tory and Monarchist, a Methodist, Crosland earned his living as a Fleet Street reviewer, critic, and editor for journals like The Outlook, The Academy, and the Penny Illustrated Paper.

    Biography: 

    For more poems, see the Academy of America Poets

     

    Biography: 
    • Currin, Jen. The Sleep of Four Cities. Vancouver: Anvil Press, 2005. PS 8605 U774 S54 Robarts Library
    • --. Hagiography. Toronto: Coach House Books, 2008. canlit offsite 02098 Fisher Rare Book Library
    Biography: 

    Charles was born on 24 November 1394, the first surviving son of Louis d'Orléans and Valentina Visconti of Milan. The Duchess Valentina was banished from court in 1396 and as a result, Charles and his siblings were brought up in their father's multiple châteaux along the Loire.