Biography: 
  • Whitfield, James Munroe. America and Other Poems. Buffalo: James S. Leavitt, 1853. Internet Archive
  • --. Poems. 1846.
Biography: 
  • Boker, George Henry. The Lessons of Life, and other Poems. 1848.
  • --. The Podesta's Daughter, and Other Miscellaneous Poems. Philadelphia: A. Hart, 1852. Internet Archive
  • --. Plays and Poems. 2 vols. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1856. Internet Archive
Biography: 

Théophile Gautier (1811-1872) started out as a painter, but he soon turned to literature. He gained a livelihood as a journalist and critic, writing poetry and novels in his spare time. Gautier excels in descriptions, and one can see in them the influence of his early interest and training in the plastic arts.

Biography: 
  • Gerson, Carole. "Marie Joussaye Fotheringham: Canada's First Woman Labour Poet." Canadian Notes & Queries 44 (Spring 1991): 21-23.
  • --. "‘Only a Working Girl’: The Story of Marie Joussaye Fotheringham." Northern Review 19 (1998): 141-60.
Biography: 

Born on January 4, 1835, in Coulston, Surrey, Lyall received his education at Eton and Haileybury College. He joined the Indian civil service at Bulandshahr in the Doab in 1856 and served in many capacities until his retirement in 1887.

Biography: 

Born April 24, 1862, to Mary Sidgwick and Edward White Benson, future archbishop of Canterbury (1882-1896), Arthur Christopher Benson became a popular essayist of Edwardian England, the librettist of England's beloved anthem, "Land of Hope and Glory," and the editor of Queen Victoria's letters.

Biography: 

Romesh Chunder Dutt was born in Calcutta on August 13, 1848, and received his education there and at University College and the Middle Temple, London. He was called to the bar and in 1869 passed the examination for entrance to the Indian civil service, in which he served -- as the only native Indian in the nineteenth century to rise to executive authority -- from 1871 to 1897.

Biography: 

Henry Clay Work, born on October 1, 1832, grew up in Middletown, Connecticut, the son of an active opponent of slavery, who helped thousands of slaves to escape north. Work took employment as a printer in Chicago in 1854, but in 1853, 1876-77, and 1882-83, Work wrote 75 songs, at first encouraged by the minstrel E. P. Christy, and then under contract to Root and Cady, music publishers.

Biography: 

Pseudonym of Samuel Langhorne Clemens, the American journalist, novelist and humorist born and raised in Missouri, Mark Twain is best known for his novels, The Prince and the Pauper (1882), A Conneticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889), The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884).

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