Though that Men do Call it Dotage

Original Text: 
British Library Add. MS 31922, fols. 55v-56 (attributed to Henry VIII); and John Stevens, Music & Poetry in the Early Tudor Court (London: Methuen, 1961): 406-07.
1Though that men do call it dotage,
2Who loveth not wanteth courage;
3And whosoever may love get,
5Or else from her which is her heir,
6And she to him must seem most fair.
7With eye and mind doth both agree.
8There is no boot: there must it be.
9The eye doth look and represent,
10But mind afformeth with full consent.
11Thus am I fixed without grudge:
12Mine eye with heart doth me so judge.
13Love maintaineth all noble courage.
15Such lovers--though they take pain--
16It were pity they should obtain,
18They hinder lovers that would be true.
19For whoso loveth should love but once.

Notes

4] fet: obtain. Back to Line
14] all of the village: "a low-brow" or "country hick." Back to Line
17] sue: petition. Back to Line
20] none: no fickle lover. Back to Line
RPO poem Editors: 
Ian Lancashire
RPO Edition: 
RPO 1997.
Form: