On the Departure of Sir Walter Scott from Abbotsford, for Naples

Original Text: 
Alaric A. Watts, ed., The Cabinet of Modern Art and Literary Souvenir (London: Hurst, 1835). AY 13.C3 SMRS #1829.
2Nor of the setting sun's pathetic light
4Spirits of Power, assembled there, complain
5For kindred Power departing from their sight;
6While Tweed, best pleased in chanting a blithe strain,
7Saddens his voice again, and yet again.
8Lift up your hearts, ye Mourners! for the might
9Of the whole world's good wishes with him goes;
10Blessings and prayers in nobler retinue
11Than sceptred king or laurelled conqueror knows,
12Follow this wondrous Potentate. Be true,

Notes

1] Scott suffered a paralytic stroke in 1831, and on September 23 he left his great country house, Abbotsford, to spend the winter in Italy. On September 19-22, Wordsworth and his daughter were Scott's guests at Abbotsford. This sonnet was written within a day or two of their departure, and first published in The Literary Souvenir for 1835. Back to Line
3] Eildon's triple height: the three Eildon Hills, a striking feature of the landscape near Melrose and Abbotsford. They were associated with legends of Thomas of Erceldoune. Back to Line
13] the midland sea: the Mediterranean. Back to Line
14] Parthenope: classical name for Naples. Back to Line
Publication Start Year: 
1835
RPO poem Editors: 
J. R. MacGillivray
RPO Edition: 
3RP 2.400.
Rhyme: 
Form: