Astrophel and Stella: Fourth Song

Original Text: 
The Countesse of Pembrokes Arcadia written by Sir Philip Sidney, Knight. Now the third time published with sundry new additions of the same author. Edinburgh: Printed by Robert Walde-graue, 1599. STC 22542.
1Onely joy, now here you are,
2Fit to heare and ease my care:
3Let my whispring voice obtaine,
4Sweete rewarde for sharpest paine:
5Take me to thee, and thee to me.
6No, no, no, no, my Deare, let be.
7     Night hath clos'd all in her cloke,
8Twinkling stars Loue-thoghts prouoke
9Danger hence good care doth keepe,
10Iealousie it selfe doth sleepe:
11Take me to thee, and thee to me:
12No, no, no, no, my Deare, let be.
13     Better place no wit can find,
14Cupids yoke to loose or bind:
15These sweet flowers on fine bed too,
16Vs in their best language woo:
17Take me to thee, and thee to me.
18No, no, no, no, my Deare, let be.
19     This small light the Moone bestows,
20Serues thy beames but to disclose,
22Feare not else, none can vs spie:
23Take me to thee, and thee to me.
24No, no, no, no, my Deare, let be.
25     That you heard was but a Mouse,
26Dumbe sleepe holdeth all the house:
27Yet asleepe, methinks they say,
28Young folkes, take time while you may
29Take me to thee, and thee to me.
30No, no, no, no, my deare, let be.
32This large offer of our blisse:
33Long stay ere he grant the same:
34Sweet then, while each thing doth frame
35Take me to thee, and thee to me.
36No, no, no, no, my Deare, let be.
37     Your faire mother is a bed,
38Candles out, and curtaines spred:
39She thinks you doe letters write:
40Write, but let me first indite:
41Take me to thee, and thee to me.
42No, no, no, no, my Deare, let be.
43     Sweete alas, why striue you thus?
44Concord better fitteth vs:
46Your power in your beautie stands,
47Take thee to me, and me to thee.
48No, no, no, no, my Deare, let be.
49     Wo to me and doe you sweare
50Me to hate, but I forbeare,
51Cursed be my destenies all,
52That brought me so high to fall:
53Soone with my death I will please thee
54No, no, no, no, my Deare, let be.

Notes

21] hap: luck, fortune, chance Back to Line
31] niggard: miserly, stingy Back to Line
45] Mars: the Roman god of war (and lover of Venus) Back to Line
Publication Start Year: 
1591
RPO poem Editors: 
Marc R. Plamondon
RPO Edition: 
2007