The Apple of Eden

Original Text: 

The Poetical Works of Charles Harpur, ed. Elizabeth Perkins (London, Sydney and Melbourne: Angus & Robertson, 1984): 51-52.

1That bright faith of Fancy which only may be
2    In the morning of manhood enthroned in the brain,
3When once 'tis dissolved, -- as a rainbow might flee,
4    Or impaired, -- like the weary moon far on the wane;
5Oh the apple of Eden has dropt from life's tree,
6    And the leaves -- the leaves only remain!
7'Tis true we may still, as if happily free,
8    Be numbered in Gayety's glittering train;
9The glad things of Nature still pleasant may be,
11Yet the apple of Eden has dropt from life's tree,
12    And the fading leaves only remain!
13For still, though in reason's cold light we may see
14    That bright faith of Fancy look wraith like and vain,
15Nor less do we feel (though too stern, it may be,
16    Of a strange vacant ache in the heart to complain)
17That the apple of Eden has dropt from life's tree,
18    While the faded leaves only remain!

Notes

10] lodestar: a person or ideal that serves as a guide. Back to Line
RPO poem Editors: 
Cameron LaFollette
RPO Edition: 
2012
Rhyme: 
Form: